Mars has liquid insides and strange insides, suggests InSight Ars Technica

Image of a lander on a reddish dry planet, showing two circular solar arrays and an array of instruments.

Zoom in / Artist’s impression of what InSight would look like after landing. Mars appears to be a frozen expanse of red dust, gaping craters and rocky terrain on the outside, but what lies beneath its windswept surface? NASA’s InSight lander may have discovered it before it took its proverbial last breaths in a dust … Read more

Saturn’s rings steal the show in new image from the Webb Ars Technica telescope

Saturn stars in this near-infrared image taken June 25 by the James Webb Space Telescope.

Zoom in / Saturn stars in this near-infrared image taken June 25 by the James Webb Space Telescope. The James Webb Space Telescope has observed Saturn for the first time, completing a family portrait of the Solar System’s ringed planets nearly a year after the mission’s first jaw-dropping image was released. Webb’s near-infrared camera took … Read more

ULA ships Vulcan upper stage to factory for more Ars Technica work

The Centaur V upper stage for the first Vulcan test flight was originally lifted atop its booster at Cape Canaveral in February.

Zoom in / The Centaur V upper stage for the first Vulcan test flight was originally lifted atop its booster at Cape Canaveral in February. United Launch Alliance technicians in Cape Canaveral, Fla., partially disassembled the first Vulcan rocket to send upper-stage launch vehicles back to its factory for reinforcements to its wafer-thin steel fuel … Read more

We finally know how the mysterious Geminids meteor shower originated Ars Technica

Image of streaks in a night sky.

Zoom in / The Geminids put on a show every year. Every year, skywatchers can watch the Geminids dart across the night sky from mid-November to late December. However, this meteor shower is highly unusual, and not just because it’s one of the easiest to see. Meteor showers usually come from comets flying close to … Read more

Trend or aberration? Russia is launching foreign Ars Technica satellites again

Satellite controllers in Dubai monitor the launch of a Soyuz rocket from Russia on Tuesday.

Zoom in / Satellite controllers in Dubai monitor the launch of a Soyuz rocket from Russia on Tuesday. For the first time since the invasion of Ukraine essentially cut off Russia’s space industry from foreign customers, a Russian rocket lifted off on Tuesday and carried satellites with commercial technology from Western companies into orbit. Payloads … Read more